NEWS
Get a Handle on SDS
Emily Unglesbee DTN Staff Reporter
Mon Jul 27, 2015 12:07 PM CDT

ST. LOUIS (DTN) -- Rain gets the blame for a lot of crop injury this year, but don't assume those yellow patches in your soybean field are all water damage. Those same symptoms could be evidence of sudden death syndrome (SDS) this summer, plant pathologists told DTN.

Patches of the disease are starting to surface in central and southeastern Iowa soybean fields, and conditions this spring and summer have been conducive for an SDS outbreak year, Iowa State University plant pathologist Daren Mueller reported in the university's Integrated Crop Management newsletter.

Much of the Midwest and South saw plentiful rainfall ...

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