NEWS
Weathering the Drought
Chris Clayton DTN Ag Policy Editor
Mon Jul 28, 2014 10:57 AM CDT

TEXHOMA, Okla. (DTN) -- Dryland wheat in parts of Oklahoma was a disaster, but recent spring rains have helped farmers such as Jerod McDaniel feel the Southern Plains may be moving out of the long-term drought.

McDaniel farms a little more than 3,000 acres along the Oklahoma-Texas panhandles, of which about 1,800 acres are irrigated. He also has nearly 7,000 acres of grassland for grazing. At 38, McDaniel feels a little hardened as a farmer because he has managed the last four crop years dealing with drought.

Winter wheat did not turn out well for Oklahoma farmers, according to USDA's ...

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