NEWS
DTN Business Blog
Marcia Zarley Taylor DTN Executive Editor
Tue Jul 10, 2007 12:32 PM CDT

Farmers aren't crying crocodile tears when they report their input costs are soaring, so I'm sympathetic to both sides in this debate. The University of Illinois's 2007 crop budgets show that typical Illinois corn growers are sinking about $300 per acre into the ground--before they pay their land costs. But they could generate a whopping $172 to $124 per acre net returns on this year's crop with normal yields and an average price of $3.50 corn (see crop budget information at www.farmdoc.uiuc.edu for details). Our farmer moderator, Adam Erwin, makes the case that 2007 is no barometer for 2008 profits--but how much ...

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