NEWS
Dan Davidson DTN Contributing Agronomist
Wed May 23, 2007 02:56 PM CDT

OMAHA (DTN) -- Seeing stands of winter annuals in late April or early May even after corn has been planted is becoming much more common; however, delaying control of winter annuals could increase insect pressure on newly planted corn.

Outbreaks of winter annuals are most common in soybean stubble that is being planted to corn. Alex Martin, a weed scientist at the University of Nebraska said increased adoption of no-till practices along with a decline in use of residual herbicides in favor of glyphosate has contributed to the increase in winter annuals.

Keith Jarvi, an integrated pest management specialist with ...

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