NEWS
Bird Flu Virus Could Mutate
Thu Jun 21, 2012 03:28 PM CDT

(Dow Jones) -- In a new experiment that shows how the bird flu virus might trigger a human pandemic, scientists induced five genetic changes in the bug and transformed it into a type capable of airborne transmission between mammals.

The findings have major implications for how H5N1 virus -- the bird flu that caused concern over the last decade -- could pose a much greater public health risk going forward. Two of the mutations the scientists created in the experiment already circulate in birds and people, and natural evolution could bring about the remaining three mutations, researchers said.

The findings ...

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