NEWS
Fertilizer From Thin Air
Thu Sep 19, 2013 02:02 PM CDT

The same wind that brings rain to a thirsty corn field is generating anhydrous ammonia needed to fertilize Minnesota crops. Researchers at the University of Minnesota West Central Research and Outreach Center, near Morris, Minn., are investigating how unused wind energy in rural areas might economically produce this important input.

Commercial anhydrous ammonia plants extract nitrogen from the atmosphere by compressing and filtering air. Pressurized hydrogen and nitrogen is driven over a catalyst to produce anhydrous ammonia. Commercial plants utilize natural gas to make the needed hydrogen component.

HYDROGEN PLANT

The Minnesota pilot ...

Quick View
Related News Stories
Blast Victims' Families Seek Closure
DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends
Uralkali 2013 Profit Slumps
DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends
Potash Corp Names New CEO
Canada's Grain Transport Conundrum
DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends
DTN Fertilizer Outlook
Dr. Dan Talks Agronomy
DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends