NEWS
Farm Iron Going Airborne
Chris Clayton DTN Ag Policy Editor
Tue Apr 30, 2013 10:05 AM CDT

OMAHA (DTN) -- The time is coming when farm iron may go airborne.

Rory Paul has been waiting for years for momentum to build on using drones to check out crops in fields. The Missouri-based consultant has been working to build a business using unmanned aircraft as a tool for farmers.

"I've been evangelizing on the subject since 2006," Paul said. "I really believe ag could be a big beneficiary."

The farm economy remains strong and there's always some farmers looking for new things to aid their operations. Thus, there's an opportunity to demonstrate to farmers that there's value in ...

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