NEWS
Ag Labor Unresolved - 1
Chris Clayton DTN Ag Policy Editor
Mon Jun 25, 2012 04:51 PM CDT

OMAHA (DTN) -- Nothing in Monday's Supreme Court ruling on illegal immigration will help farmers continue to grow labor-intensive crops with the roughly half-million illegal aliens employed in agriculture each year.

Agriculture will continue to look for a long-term fix from Congress that doesn't criminalize farmers who hire people to pick lettuce in Arizona, tomatoes in Alabama or onions in Georgia.

"It's a huge issue for agriculture. It's a huge issue for the country," said Larry Wooten, president of the North Carolina Farm Bureau and one of agriculture's leading advocates for comprehensive immigration reform. "We need to have a reasonable ...

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