NEWS
Production Blog
Pam Smith DTN\Progressive Farmer Crops Technology Editor
Fri Jun 13, 2014 02:44 PM CDT

KANKAKEE, Ill. (DTN) -- My father used to worry about soybeans breaking their necks. During tough springs, our heaviest clay soils would often crust over enough to cause emergence problems.

The fields I've seen so far this year seem to be hampered more by cool, wet, muddy conditions. Even the sandy soils I scouted outside of Kankakee, Ill., last week were showing some uneven stands -- although most of the stand issues I saw there I'd attribute to preplant residual burn.

Whatever the issue, replanting at this late date isn't always the answer. An Ohio State University release this week ...

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