NEWS
Mon Feb 25, 2013 03:36 PM CST

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) -- The Mississippi River flooding of 2011 caused $2.8 billion in damage and tested the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' system of levees, reservoirs and floodways like never before, exposing vulnerabilities that need attention, a report released Monday said.

The report from the corps said the flood hit 119 counties in the lower Mississippi River states of Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee. More than 21,000 homes and businesses and 1.2 million acres of agricultural land were affected, and more than 43,000 people felt some effects.

The Mississippi River and Tributaries system operated as it ...

Quick View
  • Betting on Shorter Beans Researchers at the University of Nebraska and Purdue University have pinpointed a gene that produ...
  • Super Food Silage has never gone out of fashion in Bath County, Kentucky, even when the lure of $6- to $8-pe...
  • Farmers Pivot Back After Storms The majority of center pivots damaged by severe weather earlier this summer in Nebraska are up an...
  • Pick Contingency Plans - 3 As crop prices and insurance coverage swoon, farmers may need to supplement incomes with federal ...
  • Weathering the Drought Parts of the panhandle and western Oklahoma are still considered as being in extreme or exception...
  • AFBF Appeal The American Farm Bureau Federation asked a federal appeals court to reverse a lower court's Sept...
  • Pick Contingency Plans - 2 Commodity payments are largely capped at $125,000 per person. People must also report under $900,...
  • Ask the Vet Some tips on fly control.
Related News Stories
DTN Ag Weather Brief
Rain Wed. in Areas of Midwest, Plains
Daily Export Grain News
Market Impact Weather
Rain Monday in Areas of Midwest, Plains
Rain Tuesday for Plains, Midwest Areas
Lack of 90-Degree Weather
Market Impact Weather
NWS River Stages
Rain Monday in Areas Plains, Midwest