NEWS
Wed Apr 3, 2013 04:53 PM CDT

FARGO, N.D. (AP) -- The landscape has changed dramatically since the record flooding of the Red River: Hundreds of once-vulnerable homes are now gone and miles of concrete floodwalls and clay levees add new protections as communities on the river's banks brace for it to overflow yet again.

Those changes over the past several years have built a buffer of green space that gives residents on the Minnesota-North Dakota border confidence as they prepare for a fourth major flood in five years -- the worst in 2009.

Having gained plenty of unwanted practice in dealing with floodwaters, Fargo kicked off ...

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