NEWS
Watch for White Mold
Emily Unglesbee DTN Staff Reporter
Wed Jul 9, 2014 10:27 AM CDT

LAWRENCE, Kan. (DTN) -- As nearly a quarter of the country's soybeans put on their first flowers, growers in some parts of the Midwest should be aware of the risk for white mold in their bean fields this summer.

The white mold fungus thrives in cool, wet soils after soybean canopies have closed up and the first flowers emerge.

North-central states such as Iowa, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin have had surplus topsoil moisture for most of this growing season. Add consistent daytime temperatures under 85 degrees Fahrenheit, and you have a recipe for the destructive and persistent white mold ...

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