NEWS
EPA Sees Conservation at Work
Chris Clayton DTN Ag Policy Editor
Tue Jul 16, 2013 12:31 PM CDT

BLOOMINGTON, Ill. (DTN) -- While EPA has become synonymous with federal regulatory overreach for agriculture, farmers last week heard more about collaboration and praise regarding efforts to reduce non-point source water pollution from nutrient loads.

"Seeing how real-time science is being incorporated into agronomic practices on the farm, how farmers and producers are willing to take some risks and make some investments, with a little bit of help from other entities to get things moving, is just inspiring," said Denise Keehner, director of the Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds for the Environmental Protection Agency. Keehner talked to farmers about ...

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