NEWS
Advocating for the Soil - 2
Chris Clayton DTN Ag Policy Editor
Tue Sep 18, 2012 06:48 AM CDT

BISMARCK, N.D. (DTN) -- An end-of-July bus tour of farms and research plots had the feel of a pilgrimage as it journeyed through the Dakotas.

The pilgrims -- farmers and conservationists interested in soil health -- complained little about the late July heat while staring at shovelfuls of soil on various farms, partly because Dakota temps were cooler than those at home in Kansas, Nebraska and Oklahoma. An impromptu, two-hour roadside class in 98 degrees thanks to a bus-engine implosion only led to deeper discussions about how to build soil organic matter, rather than grumbling.

The fact that this roadside ...

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