NEWS
Wed Sep 18, 2013 07:54 AM CDT

JOHNSTOWN, Colo. (AP) — Surging waters in Colorado swept away barns, silos and fences and left houses covered in mud in this northern agricultural town. The flood waters were so powerful they uprooted irrigation pipes and spread them around the fields here, leaving lakes next to which cattle now graze.

They also brought instant relief to drought-hardened areas, with the promise of moisture restored in deep soils and the possibility of reservoirs refilling to help farmers well into next year.

"There is a silver lining if we look down the road," said Ron Carleton, the deputy commissioner of agriculture for ...

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