NEWS
Scientists Behind The Seed - 1
Pam Smith DTN\Progressive Farmer Crops Technology Editor
Fri Oct 11, 2013 02:33 PM CDT

DECATUR, Ill. (DTN) -- The spindly camelina plant may look like more of a weed than a crop, but Jan Jaworski hopes the oilseed will one day find a place in U.S. farm fields. A plant biochemist conducting research at the nonprofit research institute Donald Danforth Plant Science Center has a longer view than most.

"Our mission is to feed the hungry and improve the environment through plant science," said Jaworski, who joined the St. Louis research center after 28 years on the faculty of Miami University in Ohio. "Most of what we are researching will have an impact 10 ...

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