NEWS
Stocker Health
Mon Feb 24, 2014 11:09 AM CST

Mark Bray has one of the toughest jobs in the cattle business. He makes a living buying 370- to 440-pound highly stressed calves from sale barns and turning them into valuable feeder cattle. It's a job that starts the minute the calves step off the trailer at Ridgecrest Farm in Stokes County, N.C.

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"We buy thin heifers, the kind nobody else wants. When they come to us, they have that deer-in-the-headlights look. For a few weeks, we're more babysitters than cattlemen," said Bray.

Upon delivery, Bray eases the stressed heifers into a lot with high-quality grass hay, clean ...

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