NEWS
Salvaging Soybeans
Russ Quinn DTN Staff Reporter
Fri Aug 10, 2012 07:03 AM CDT

OMAHA (DTN) -- Farmers who could have extremely low yielding soybean crops because of the drought this growing season might want to consider turning the crop into forage. While there are many challenges to haying soybeans, the practice could help farmers salvage some revenue from a near complete crop failure.

Many farmers across the Corn Belt are facing this situation. Gary Cramer, a Sedgwick County ag educator for Kansas State University Research and Extension located in Wichita, reported that many farmers in central and south-central Kansas are deciding to cut and bale soybeans for forage.

"We are seeing it now ...

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