NEWS
Recycling Nutrients
Dan Davidson DTN Contributing Agronomist
Mon Apr 7, 2014 12:21 PM CDT

Farmers are going to great lengths to manage corn residue. More acres of continuous corn, less tillage, higher yields and tougher stalks all contribute to residue buildup on the soil surface.

The traditional approach has been to size residue into smaller pieces and tie it down by mixing it with a little soil. However, this traditional practice doesn't work fast enough to satisfy grower expectations and particularly when they are dealing with tough Bt stalks and stand issues. That's bringing a variety of new approaches to the market, including some products that facilitate quicker residue breakdown.

One of the more ...

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