NEWS
Rooted in Conservation
Thu Feb 27, 2014 12:01 PM CST

As Lewis Bainbridge and his sons, Matthew and Neal, scout one of their fields growing a cover crop, he pulls out a thick radish with a massive root ball crawling with earthworms. "We love to see that," he says, admiring the plump worms. "Cover crops keep the soil busy with all sorts of microbial action, including worms." Along with moisture retention, he adds, the crop keeps their heavy clay soils loose and mellow for the corn and soybeans to come.

The Bainbridges plant a cocktail of four to six different cover crops, which ...

Quick View
  • The New Dicamba At an event exhibiting the company's soon-to-arrive Dicamba-tolerant soybean trait, Monsanto repr...
  • Rates Too Low Too Long Discounted interest rates have led to unintended consequences in land values, a shortage of funds...
  • Center Pivots Take a Beating Severe storms in mid-June have damaged hundreds of center pivot irrigation systems in Nebraska al...
  • "Easy Money Times Over" Feeding the world population won't be as hard as expected over the next decade some experts forec...
  • A Hunger for High-Tech The Gruhlkey brothers of Wildorado, Texas, are using technology and thoughtful cropping choices t...
  • Clearing the Air EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy told a group of agribusiness representatives that her agency want...
  • No More Outlaw Vets Veterinarians can start breathing a little easier now when they go to work, without the fear that...
  • Ask the Vet My vet diagnosed anaplaz and I've never heard of that.
Related News Stories
HRS Tour -- Final
Passionate About Pollination
Corn Reports Rosy
View From the Cab
Dr. Dan Talks Agronomy
Crop Tech Corner
Shaw: Under the Agridome
One Lucky Day
View From the Cab
Some Locks Still Closed