NEWS
Dan Miller Progressive Farmer Senior Editor
Mon Feb 4, 2013 11:18 AM CST

KISMET, Kan. (DTN) -- When dark brush strokes of rain drifted across far-away horizons on a September day, it raised hopes that a long drought would end for Clint Reiss and his family's farm.

Four inches of rain fell two weeks before, well-received in an area that average 16 to 18 inches a year and usually has temperatures top 90 degrees at least 90 days a year.

This year had been a challenge. On June 28, Kansas saw temperatures soar to 118 degrees, nearly equaling the hottest day recorded of 121 degrees Fahrenheit, back in 1936.

On this September day, ...

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