NEWS
Urban C. Lehner Editor Emeritus
Tue Jan 29, 2013 01:45 PM CST

Expand or die. For decades that’s been commercial agriculture’s creed. Buy more land. Buy bigger equipment. Increase yields. Grow.

Jim Andrew practices a different creed: Forget expansion, focus on profit—and doing well by the environment. Squeeze costs, including equipment costs. Labor mightily to stop soil erosion and runoff.

Call it the thrifty Scotsman approach to farming—or the conservationist approach. To this 63-year-old great-grandson of Scottish immigrants, the two approaches complement each other as naturally as vanilla ice cream and chocolate syrup.

“I like to think that we are doing everything I conceivably could do within reason for conservation purposes,” Andrew ...

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