NEWS
Discovering Conservation
Todd Neeley DTN Staff Reporter
Mon Nov 4, 2013 12:51 PM CST

EAGLE GROVE, Iowa (DTN) -- Farmer Tim Smith has talked to other Eagle Grove, Iowa-area producers at local coffee shops for years.

In discussions over a hot cup, farmers often question the source of nitrates found in state waters and downstream in the Gulf of Mexico.

During an environmental discovery tour of the Boone River watershed led by the Iowa Soybean Association Thursday, Smith said he realized in recent years that he was part of the problem.

"All the years I've been farming I've heard about the nitrate issue," he said.

"I wondered where it was coming from. Nine out ...

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