NEWS
No Crash Landing Ahead
Marcia Zarley Taylor DTN Executive Editor
Mon Feb 17, 2014 11:33 AM CST

HADDONFIELD, N.J. (DTN) -- Farmland values in some states are beginning to show signs of stress cracks, but one of the nation's largest farm mortgage holders doubts there's a crash landing ahead.

AgriBank, the Farm Credit System district bank that sources funds for Farm Credit Associations covering half of the nation's cropland, still sees wide disparities in farmland appreciation depending on the 15 states within its territory. Between 2012 and 2013, USDA reported North Dakota values soared 41% thanks to the gold rush from the Bakken oil fields while Wisconsin notched only 2% gains and Wyoming actually lost about 3%.

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