NEWS
Brazil's Port Problem - 1
Alastair Stewart South America Correspondent
Mon Dec 17, 2012 12:40 PM CST

SANTOS, Brazil (DTN) -- A mangled pile of metal glints in the sunshine on the dockside at Santos port.

It's the remains of a ship loader dragged into the dock one evening in September by a badly-moored vessel.

Port authorities at Brazil's busiest port remain uncertain about what caused the accident, but it is clear that the destruction of one of the three grain elevators at the public terminal couldn't have happened at a worse time.

Farm leaders were already worried that Brazil's perennially overstretched ports simply wouldn't cope with an expected 20% jump in soybean exports in 2013, and ...

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