LAND MANAGEMENT NEWS
Advocating for the Soil - 3
Chris Clayton DTN Ag Policy Editor
Wed Sep 19, 2012 06:42 AM CDT

LONGFORD, Kan. (DTN) -- If the soil health movement were a religion, Ray Archuleta would be declared an apostle.

The 51-year-old soil agronomist at USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service spends almost all of his time traveling across the country talking to farmers about his gospel of integrating no-till -- or never-till -- practices, cover crops and livestock. His messages are all meant to improve soil health on farms.

Driving across cropland in central Kansas, Archuleta practically growls as he spies a sliver of ground devoid of cover. He is one of a group of agriculturalists who see a need for ...

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