Farmers, Activists Stand Against Pipeli
Todd Neeley DTN Staff Reporter
Mon Apr 22, 2013 11:17 AM CDT

GRAND ISLAND, Neb. (DTN) -- When the first proposed corridor for TransCanada's Keystone XL pipeline was announced, Fullerton, Neb., farmer Jim Tarnick's land was left unaffected.

That changed in the newly proposed route. It would go around Nebraska's environmentally sensitive Sandhills -- but smack dab through Tarnick's land.

The face of his farm could change forever if the Obama administration approves the controversial 875-mile pipeline, Tarnick told DTN following his testimony during what was at times a contentious U.S. Department of State hearing on the project Thursday in Grand Island, Neb.

Tarnick was one of more than 100 people who ...

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