FARM LIFE NEWS
CRP Vets Still See Great Benefits
Mon Mar 24, 2014 08:43 AM CDT

Leon Bracker has always had an interest in habitat preservation. He has farms in western Iowa as well as Nebraska. His Iowa farmland is located in the fragile Loess Hills, a stretch of 200-foot hills formed by wind-deposited soil running along the Missouri River from Westfield, Iowa, down to Mound City, in northwest Missouri. Placing some of his land in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) seemed not only ideal but also critical.

"This soil type is sandy and highly erodible," Bracker explains. "If you don't take care of it, you'll have erosion problems." ...

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