South America Calling
Alastair Stewart South America Correspondent

Friday 01/31/14

Rain Saves Argentine Soybeans, Too Late for Some Corn

Rainfall of between 1 1/2 to 4 inches fell over the past week in key Argentine grain regions, coming just in time for the soybean crop but a little too late for corn, the Rosario Cereals Exchange said.

Soybeans in the nucleus, the top-producing regions in the northern Buenos Aires province and southern Sante Fe and Entre Rios, were in desperate need of the rain after some hot, dry weather in December and mid-January. As such, last week's showers provided vital sustenance just as the majority of the crop entered the flowering and grain-filling, key yield-defining phases. Argentina remains on track for a good crop, the Rosario Exchange said in an weekly report.

Rains fell across the whole of the nucleus between Jan. 23 and Jan. 29. The heaviest rains were reported in northern Buenos Aires, where instances of rainfall of 6 inches of precipitation and more were recorded.

"In the face of this new climatic panorama, the soybean crop will once again develop strongly," said the Rosario exchange.

However, the same cannot be said for early planted corn, which has suffered irreversible losses due to the recent dry weather. With early planted crops already reaching maturity, the rains simply fell too late. As a result, some areas can only expect yields of 64 to 80 bushels per acre, about half the expected level. Later-planted corn remains in good condition, though.

The Buenos Aires Cereals Exchange focused on conditions in the northern grain belt in its weekly report.

These regions also received abundant rains last week, helping the development of a soybean crop that is generally less mature than in the nucleus. However, isolated spots are in need of further showers.

For the coming week, high temperatures are expected to return to northern growing regions, accompanied by light to moderate showers, said the Buenos Aires exchange.

Heavier rains are expected in parts of the nucleus, further aiding the development of soybean crops there.

Between Feb. 6 and Feb. 12, Argentina will see less rain but lower temperatures, offering a break from the scorching conditions that have characterized much of this season, said the exchange.

(AG)

Posted at 9:11AM CST 01/31/14 by Alastair Stewart
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